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MySQL 8.0 Reference Manual  /  ...  /  Online DDL Operations

15.12.1 Online DDL Operations

Online support details, syntax examples, and usage notes for DDL operations are provided under the following topics in this section.

Index Operations

The following table provides an overview of online DDL support for index operations. An asterisk indicates additional information, an exception, or a dependency. For details, see Syntax and Usage Notes.

Table 15.12 Online DDL Support for Index Operations

Operation Instant In Place Rebuilds Table Permits Concurrent DML Only Modifies Metadata
Creating or adding a secondary index No Yes No Yes No
Dropping an index No Yes No Yes Yes
Renaming an index No Yes No Yes Yes
Adding a FULLTEXT index No Yes* No* No No
Adding a SPATIAL index No Yes No No No
Changing the index type Yes Yes No Yes Yes

Syntax and Usage Notes
  • Creating or adding a secondary index

    CREATE INDEX name ON table (col_list);
    ALTER TABLE tbl_name ADD INDEX name (col_list);

    The table remains available for read and write operations while the index is being created. The CREATE INDEX statement only finishes after all transactions that are accessing the table are completed, so that the initial state of the index reflects the most recent contents of the table.

    Online DDL support for adding secondary indexes means that you can generally speed the overall process of creating and loading a table and associated indexes by creating the table without secondary indexes, then adding secondary indexes after the data is loaded.

    A newly created secondary index contains only the committed data in the table at the time the CREATE INDEX or ALTER TABLE statement finishes executing. It does not contain any uncommitted values, old versions of values, or values marked for deletion but not yet removed from the old index.

    Some factors affect the performance, space usage, and semantics of this operation. For details, see Section 15.12.6, “Online DDL Limitations”.

  • Dropping an index

    DROP INDEX name ON table;
    ALTER TABLE tbl_name DROP INDEX name;

    The table remains available for read and write operations while the index is being dropped. The DROP INDEX statement only finishes after all transactions that are accessing the table are completed, so that the initial state of the index reflects the most recent contents of the table.

  • Renaming an index

    ALTER TABLE tbl_name RENAME INDEX old_index_name TO new_index_name, ALGORITHM=INPLACE, LOCK=NONE;
  • Adding a FULLTEXT index

    CREATE FULLTEXT INDEX name ON table(column);

    Adding the first FULLTEXT index rebuilds the table if there is no user-defined FTS_DOC_ID column. Additional FULLTEXT indexes may be added without rebuilding the table.

  • Adding a SPATIAL index

    CREATE TABLE geom (g GEOMETRY NOT NULL);
    ALTER TABLE geom ADD SPATIAL INDEX(g), ALGORITHM=INPLACE, LOCK=SHARED;

    Adding the first FULLTEXT index rebuilds the table if there is no user-defined FTS_DOC_ID column. Additional FULLTEXT indexes may be added without rebuilding the table.

  • Changing the index type (USING {BTREE | HASH})

    ALTER TABLE tbl_name DROP INDEX i1, ADD INDEX i1(key_part,...) USING BTREE, ALGORITHM=INSTANT;

Primary Key Operations

The following table provides an overview of online DDL support for primary key operations. An asterisk indicates additional information, an exception, or a dependency. See Syntax and Usage Notes.

Table 15.13 Online DDL Support for Primary Key Operations

Operation Instant In Place Rebuilds Table Permits Concurrent DML Only Modifies Metadata
Adding a primary key No Yes* Yes* Yes No
Dropping a primary key No No Yes No No
Dropping a primary key and adding another No Yes Yes Yes No

Syntax and Usage Notes
  • Adding a primary key

    ALTER TABLE tbl_name ADD PRIMARY KEY (column), ALGORITHM=INPLACE, LOCK=NONE;

    Rebuilds the table in place. Data is reorganized substantially, making it an expensive operation. ALGORITHM=INPLACE is not permitted under certain conditions if columns have to be converted to NOT NULL.

    Restructuring the clustered index always requires copying of table data. Thus, it is best to define the primary key when you create a table, rather than issuing ALTER TABLE ... ADD PRIMARY KEY later.

    When you create a UNIQUE or PRIMARY KEY index, MySQL must do some extra work. For UNIQUE indexes, MySQL checks that the table contains no duplicate values for the key. For a PRIMARY KEY index, MySQL also checks that none of the PRIMARY KEY columns contains a NULL.

    When you add a primary key using the ALGORITHM=COPY clause, MySQL converts NULL values in the associated columns to default values: 0 for numbers, an empty string for character-based columns and BLOBs, and 0000-00-00 00:00:00 for DATETIME. This is a non-standard behavior that Oracle recommends you not rely on. Adding a primary key using ALGORITHM=INPLACE is only permitted when the SQL_MODE setting includes the strict_trans_tables or strict_all_tables flags; when the SQL_MODE setting is strict, ALGORITHM=INPLACE is permitted, but the statement can still fail if the requested primary key columns contain NULL values. The ALGORITHM=INPLACE behavior is more standard-compliant.

    If you create a table without a primary key, InnoDB chooses one for you, which can be the first UNIQUE key defined on NOT NULL columns, or a system-generated key. To avoid uncertainty and the potential space requirement for an extra hidden column, specify the PRIMARY KEY clause as part of the CREATE TABLE statement.

    MySQL creates a new clustered index by copying the existing data from the original table to a temporary table that has the desired index structure. Once the data is completely copied to the temporary table, the original table is renamed with a different temporary table name. The temporary table comprising the new clustered index is renamed with the name of the original table, and the original table is dropped from the database.

    The online performance enhancements that apply to operations on secondary indexes do not apply to the primary key index. The rows of an InnoDB table are stored in a clustered index organized based on the primary key, forming what some database systems call an index-organized table. Because the table structure is closely tied to the primary key, redefining the primary key still requires copying the data.

    When an operation on the primary key uses ALGORITHM=INPLACE, even though the data is still copied, it is more efficient than using ALGORITHM=COPY because:

    • No undo logging or associated redo logging is required for ALGORITHM=INPLACE. These operations add overhead to DDL statements that use ALGORITHM=COPY.

    • The secondary index entries are pre-sorted, and so can be loaded in order.

    • The change buffer is not used, because there are no random-access inserts into the secondary indexes.

  • Dropping a primary key

    ALTER TABLE tbl_name DROP PRIMARY KEY, ALGORITHM=COPY;

    Only ALGORITHM=COPY supports dropping a primary key without adding a new one in the same ALTER TABLE statement.

  • Dropping a primary key and adding another

    ALTER TABLE tbl_name DROP PRIMARY KEY, ADD PRIMARY KEY (column), ALGORITHM=INPLACE, LOCK=NONE;

    Data is reorganized substantially, making it an expensive operation.

Column Operations

The following table provides an overview of online DDL support for column operations. An asterisk indicates additional information, an exception, or a dependency. For details, see Syntax and Usage Notes.

Table 15.14 Online DDL Support for Column Operations

Operation Instant In Place Rebuilds Table Permits Concurrent DML Only Modifies Metadata
Adding a column Yes* Yes Yes Yes* No
Dropping a column No Yes Yes Yes No
Renaming a column No Yes No Yes* Yes
Reordering columns No Yes Yes Yes No
Setting a column default value Yes Yes No Yes Yes
Changing the column data type No No Yes No No
Extending VARCHAR column size No Yes No Yes Yes
Dropping the column default value Yes Yes No Yes Yes
Changing the auto-increment value No Yes No Yes No*
Making a column NULL No Yes Yes* Yes No
Making a column NOT NULL No Yes* Yes* Yes No
Modifying the definition of an ENUM or SET column Yes Yes No Yes Yes

Syntax and Usage Notes
  • Adding a column

    ALTER TABLE tbl_name ADD COLUMN column_name column_definition, ALGORITHM=INSTANT;

    Concurrent DML is not permitted when adding an auto-increment column. Data is reorganized substantially, making it an expensive operation. At a minimum, ALGORITHM=INPLACE, LOCK=SHARED is required.

    The following limitations apply when the INSTANT algorithm is used to add a column:

    • Adding a column cannot be combined in the same statement with other ALTER TABLE actions that do not support ALGORITHM=INSTANT.

    • A column can only be added as the last column of the table. Adding a column to any other position among other columns is not supported.

    • Columns cannot be added to tables that use ROW_FORMAT=COMPRESSED.

    • Columns cannot be added to tables that include a FULLTEXT index.

    • Columns cannot be added to temporary tables. Temporary tables only support ALGORITHM=COPY.

    • Columns cannot be added to tables that reside in the data dictionary tablespace.

    • Row size limits are not evaluated when adding a column. However, row size limits are checked during DML operations that insert and update rows in the table.

    Multiple columns may be added in the same ALTER TABLE statement. For example:

    ALTER TABLE t1 ADD COLUMN c2 INT, ADD COLUMN c3 INT, ALGORITHM=INSTANT;

    INFORMATION_SCHEMA.INNODB_TABLES and INFORMATION_SCHEMA.INNODB_COLUMNS provide metadata for instantly added columns. INFORMATION_SCHEMA.INNODB_TABLES.INSTANT_COLS shows number of columns in the table prior to adding the first instant column. INFORMATION_SCHEMA.INNODB_COLUMNS.HAS_DEFAULT and DEFAULT_VALUE provide metadata about default values for instantly added columns.

  • Dropping a column

    ALTER TABLE tbl_name DROP COLUMN column_name, ALGORITHM=INPLACE, LOCK=NONE;

    Data is reorganized substantially, making it an expensive operation.

  • Renaming a column

    ALTER TABLE tbl CHANGE old_col_name new_col_name data_type, ALGORITHM=INPLACE, LOCK=NONE;

    To permit concurrent DML, keep the same data type and only change the column name.

    When you keep the same data type and [NOT] NULL attribute, only changing the column name, the operation can always be performed online.

    You can also rename a column that is part of a foreign key constraint. The foreign key definition is automatically updated to use the new column name. Renaming a column participating in a foreign key only works with ALGORITHM=INPLACE. If you use the ALGORITHM=COPY clause, or some other condition causes the command to use ALGORITHM=COPY behind the scenes, the ALTER TABLE statement fails.

    ALGORITHM=INPLACE is not supported for renaming a generated column.

  • Reordering columns

    To reorder columns, use FIRST or AFTER in CHANGE or MODIFY operations.

    ALTER TABLE tbl_name MODIFY COLUMN col_name column_definition FIRST, ALGORITHM=INPLACE, LOCK=NONE;

    Data is reorganized substantially, making it an expensive operation.

  • Changing the column data type

    ALTER TABLE tbl_name CHANGE c1 c1 BIGINT, ALGORITHM=COPY;

    Changing the column data type is only supported with ALGORITHM=COPY.

  • Extending VARCHAR column size

    ALTER TABLE tbl_name CHANGE COLUMN c1 c1 VARCHAR(255), ALGORITHM=INPLACE, LOCK=NONE;

    The number of length bytes required by a VARCHAR column must remain the same. For VARCHAR columns of 0 to 255 bytes in size, one length byte is required to encode the value. For VARCHAR columns of 256 bytes in size or more, two length bytes are required. As a result, in-place ALTER TABLE only supports increasing VARCHAR column size from 0 to 255 bytes, or from 256 bytes to a greater size. In-place ALTER TABLE does not support increasing the size of a VARCHAR column from less than 256 bytes to a size equal to or greater than 256 bytes. In this case, the number of required length bytes changes from 1 to 2, which is only supported by a table copy (ALGORITHM=COPY). For example, attempting to change VARCHAR column size for a single byte character set from VARCHAR(255) to VARCHAR(256) using in-place ALTER TABLE returns this error:

    ALTER TABLE tbl_name ALGORITHM=INPLACE, CHANGE COLUMN c1 c1 VARCHAR(256);
    ERROR 0A000: ALGORITHM=INPLACE is not supported. Reason: Cannot change
    column type INPLACE. Try ALGORITHM=COPY.
    Note

    The byte length of a VARCHAR column is dependant on the byte length of the character set.

    Decreasing VARCHAR size using in-place ALTER TABLE is not supported. Decreasing VARCHAR size requires a table copy (ALGORITHM=COPY).

  • Setting a column default value

    ALTER TABLE tbl_name ALTER COLUMN col SET DEFAULT literal, ALGORITHM=INSTANT;

    Only modifies table metadata. Default column values are stored in the data dictionary.

  • Dropping a column default value

    ALTER TABLE tbl ALTER COLUMN col DROP DEFAULT, ALGORITHM=INSTANT;
  • Changing the auto-increment value

    ALTER TABLE table AUTO_INCREMENT=next_value, ALGORITHM=INPLACE, LOCK=NONE;

    Modifies a value stored in memory, not the data file.

    In a distributed system using replication or sharding, you sometimes reset the auto-increment counter for a table to a specific value. The next row inserted into the table uses the specified value for its auto-increment column. You might also use this technique in a data warehousing environment where you periodically empty all the tables and reload them, and restart the auto-increment sequence from 1.

  • Making a column NULL

    ALTER TABLE tbl_name MODIFY COLUMN column_name data_type NULL, ALGORITHM=INPLACE, LOCK=NONE;

    Rebuilds the table in place. Data is reorganized substantially, making it an expensive operation.

  • Making a column NOT NULL

    ALTER TABLE tbl_name MODIFY COLUMN column_name data_type NOT NULL, ALGORITHM=INPLACE, LOCK=NONE;

    Rebuilds the table in place. STRICT_ALL_TABLES or STRICT_TRANS_TABLES SQL_MODE is required for the operation to succeed. The operation fails if the column contains NULL values. The server prohibits changes to foreign key columns that have the potential to cause loss of referential integrity. See Section 13.1.8, “ALTER TABLE Syntax”. Data is reorganized substantially, making it an expensive operation.

  • Modifying the definition of an ENUM or SET column

    CREATE TABLE t1 (c1 ENUM('a', 'b', 'c'));
    ALTER TABLE t1 MODIFY COLUMN c1 ENUM('a', 'b', 'c', 'd'), ALGORITHM=INSTANT;

    Modifying the definition of an ENUM or SET column by adding new enumeration or set members to the end of the list of valid member values may be performed instantly or in place, as long as the storage size of the data type does not change. For example, adding a member to a SET column that has 8 members changes the required storage per value from 1 byte to 2 bytes; this requires a table copy. Adding members in the middle of the list causes renumbering of existing members, which requires a table copy.

Generated Column Operations

The following table provides an overview of online DDL support for generated column operations. For details, see Syntax and Usage Notes.

Table 15.15 Online DDL Support for Generated Column Operations

Operation Instant In Place Rebuilds Table Permits Concurrent DML Only Modifies Metadata
Adding a STORED column No No Yes No No
Modifying STORED column order No No Yes No No
Dropping a STORED column No Yes Yes Yes No
Adding a VIRTUAL column Yes Yes No Yes Yes
Modifying VIRTUAL column order No No Yes No No
Dropping a VIRTUAL column Yes Yes No Yes Yes

Syntax and Usage Notes
  • Adding a STORED column

    ALTER TABLE t1 ADD COLUMN (c2 INT GENERATED ALWAYS AS (c1 + 1) STORED), ALGORITHM=COPY;

    ADD COLUMN is not an in-place operation for stored columns (done without using a temporary table) because the expression must be evaluated by the server.

  • Modifying STORED column order

    ALTER TABLE t1 MODIFY COLUMN c2 INT GENERATED ALWAYS AS (c1 + 1) STORED FIRST, ALGORITHM=COPY;

    Rebuilds the table in place.

  • Dropping a STORED column

    ALTER TABLE t1 DROP COLUMN c2, ALGORITHM=INPLACE, LOCK=NONE;

    Rebuilds the table in place.

  • Adding a VIRTUAL column

    ALTER TABLE t1 ADD COLUMN (c2 INT GENERATED ALWAYS AS (c1 + 1) VIRTUAL), ALGORITHM=INSTANT;

    Adding a virtual column can be performed instantly or in place for non-partitioned tables.

    Adding a VIRTUAL is not an in-place operation for partitioned tables.

  • Modifying VIRTUAL column order

    ALTER TABLE t1 MODIFY COLUMN c2 INT GENERATED ALWAYS AS (c1 + 1) VIRTUAL FIRST, ALGORITHM=COPY;
  • Dropping a VIRTUAL column

    ALTER TABLE t1 DROP COLUMN c2, ALGORITHM=INSTANT;

    Dropping a VIRTUAL column can be performed instantly or in place for non-partitioned tables.

Foreign Key Operations

The following table provides an overview of online DDL support for foreign key operations. An asterisk indicates additional information, an exception, or a dependency. For details, see Syntax and Usage Notes.

Table 15.16 Online DDL Support for Foreign Key Operations

Operation Instant In Place Rebuilds Table Permits Concurrent DML Only Modifies Metadata
Adding a foreign key constraint No Yes* No Yes Yes
Dropping a foreign key constraint No Yes No Yes Yes

Syntax and Usage Notes
  • Adding a foreign key constraint

    The INPLACE algorithm is supported when foreign_key_checks is disabled. Otherwise, only the COPY algorithm is supported.

    ALTER TABLE tbl1 ADD CONSTRAINT fk_name FOREIGN KEY index (col1) 
      REFERENCES tbl2(col2) referential_actions;
  • Dropping a foreign key constraint

    ALTER TABLE tbl DROP FOREIGN KEY fk_name;

    Dropping a foreign key can be performed online with the foreign_key_checks option enabled or disabled.

    If you do not know the names of the foreign key constraints on a particular table, issue the following statement and find the constraint name in the CONSTRAINT clause for each foreign key:

    SHOW CREATE TABLE table\G

    Or, query the INFORMATION_SCHEMA.TABLE_CONSTRAINTS table and use the CONSTRAINT_NAME and CONSTRAINT_TYPE columns to identify the foreign key names.

    You can also drop a foreign key and its associated index in a single statement:

    ALTER TABLE table DROP FOREIGN KEY constraint, DROP INDEX index;
Note

If foreign keys are already present in the table being altered (that is, it is a child table containing a FOREIGN KEY ... REFERENCE clause), additional restrictions apply to online DDL operations, even those not directly involving the foreign key columns:

  • An ALTER TABLE on the child table could wait for another transaction to commit, if a change to the parent table causes associated changes in the child table through an ON UPDATE or ON DELETE clause using the CASCADE or SET NULL parameters.

  • In the same way, if a table is the parent table in a foreign key relationship, even though it does not contain any FOREIGN KEY clauses, it could wait for the ALTER TABLE to complete if an INSERT, UPDATE, or DELETE statement causes an ON UPDATE or ON DELETE action in the child table.

Table Operations

The following table provides an overview of online DDL support for table operations. An asterisk indicates additional information, an exception, or a dependency. For details, see Syntax and Usage Notes.

Table 15.17 Online DDL Support for Table Operations

Operation Instant In Place Rebuilds Table Permits Concurrent DML Only Modifies Metadata
Changing the ROW_FORMAT No Yes Yes Yes No
Changing the KEY_BLOCK_SIZE No Yes Yes Yes No
Setting persistent table statistics No Yes No Yes Yes
Specifying a character set No Yes Yes* No No
Converting a character set No No Yes* No No
Optimizing a table No Yes* Yes Yes No
Rebuilding with the FORCE option No Yes* Yes Yes No
Performing a null rebuild No Yes* Yes Yes No
Renaming a table Yes Yes No Yes Yes

Syntax and Usage Notes
  • Changing the ROW_FORMAT

    ALTER TABLE tbl_name ROW_FORMAT = row_format, ALGORITHM=INPLACE, LOCK=NONE;

    Data is reorganized substantially, making it an expensive operation.

    For additional information about the ROW_FORMAT option, see Table Options.

  • Changing the KEY_BLOCK_SIZE

    ALTER TABLE tbl_name KEY_BLOCK_SIZE = value, ALGORITHM=INPLACE, LOCK=NONE;

    Data is reorganized substantially, making it an expensive operation.

    For additional information about the KEY_BLOCK_SIZE option, see Table Options.

  • Setting persistent table statistics options

    ALTER TABLE tbl_name STATS_PERSISTENT=0, STATS_SAMPLE_PAGES=20, STATS_AUTO_RECALC=1, ALGORITHM=INPLACE, LOCK=NONE;

    Only modifies table metadata.

    Persistent statistics include STATS_PERSISTENT, STATS_AUTO_RECALC, and STATS_SAMPLE_PAGES. For more information, see Section 15.6.11.1, “Configuring Persistent Optimizer Statistics Parameters”.

  • Specifying a character set

    ALTER TABLE tbl_name CHARACTER SET = charset_name, ALGORITHM=INPLACE, LOCK=NONE;

    Rebuilds the table if the new character encoding is different.

  • Converting a character set

    ALTER TABLE tbl_name CONVERT TO CHARACTER SET charset_name, ALGORITHM=COPY;

    Rebuilds the table if the new character encoding is different.

  • Optimizing a table

    OPTIMIZE TABLE tbl_name;

    In-place operation is not supported for tables with FULLTEXT indexes. The operation uses the INPLACE algorithm, but ALGORITHM and LOCK syntax is not permitted.

  • Rebuilding a table with the FORCE option

    ALTER TABLE tbl_name FORCE, ALGORITHM=INPLACE, LOCK=NONE;

    Uses ALGORITHM=INPLACE as of MySQL 5.6.17. ALGORITHM=INPLACE is not supported for tables with FULLTEXT indexes.

  • Performing a "null" rebuild

    ALTER TABLE tbl_name ENGINE=InnoDB, ALGORITHM=INPLACE, LOCK=NONE;

    Uses ALGORITHM=INPLACE as of MySQL 5.6.17. ALGORITHM=INPLACE is not supported for tables with FULLTEXT indexes.

  • Renaming a table

    ALTER TABLE old_tbl_name RENAME TO new_tbl_name, ALGORITHM=INSTANT;

    Renaming a table can be performed instantly or in place. MySQL renames files that correspond to the table tbl_name without making a copy. (You can also use the RENAME TABLE statement to rename tables. See Section 13.1.33, “RENAME TABLE Syntax”.) Privileges granted specifically for the renamed table are not migrated to the new name. They must be changed manually.

Tablespace Operations

The following table provides an overview of online DDL support for tablespace operations. For details, see Syntax and Usage Notes.

Table 15.18 Online DDL Support for Tablespace Operations

Operation Instant In Place Rebuilds Table Permits Concurrent DML Only Modifies Metadata
Renaming a general tablespace No Yes No Yes Yes
Enabling or disabling general tablespace encryption No Yes No Yes No
Enabling or disabling file-per-table tablespace encryption No No Yes No No

Syntax and Usage Notes

Partitioning Operations

With the exception of some ALTER TABLE partitioning clauses, online DDL operations for partitioned InnoDB tables follow the same rules that apply to regular InnoDB tables.

Some ALTER TABLE partitioning clauses do not go through the same internal online DDL API as regular non-partitioned InnoDB tables. As a result, online support for ALTER TABLE partitioning clauses varies.

The following table shows the online status for each ALTER TABLE partitioning statement. Regardless of the online DDL API that is used, MySQL attempts to minimize data copying and locking where possible.

ALTER TABLE partitioning options that use ALGORITHM=COPY or that only permit ALGORITHM=DEFAULT, LOCK=DEFAULT, repartition the table using the COPY algorithm. In other words, a new partitioned table is created with the new partitioning scheme. The newly created table includes any changes applied by the ALTER TABLE statement, and table data is copied into the new table structure.

Table 15.19 Online DDL Support for Partitioning Operations

Partitioning Clause Instant In Place Permits DML Notes
PARTITION BY No No No Permits ALGORITHM=COPY, LOCK={DEFAULT|SHARED|EXCLUSIVE}
ADD PARTITION No Yes* Yes* ALGORITHM=INPLACE, LOCK={DEFAULT|NONE|SHARED|EXCLUSISVE} is supported for RANGE and LIST partitions, ALGORITHM=INPLACE, LOCK={DEFAULT|SHARED|EXCLUSISVE} for HASH and KEY partitions, and ALGORITHM=COPY, LOCK={SHARED|EXCLUSIVE} for all partition types. Does not copy existing data for tables partitioned by RANGE or LIST. Concurrent queries are permitted with ALGORITHM=COPY for tables partitioned by HASH or LIST, as MySQL copies the data while holding a shared lock.
DROP PARTITION No Yes* Yes*

ALGORITHM=INPLACE, LOCK={DEFAULT|NONE|SHARED|EXCLUSIVE} is supported. Does not copy data for tables partitioned by RANGE or LIST.

DROP PARTITION with ALGORITHM=INPLACE deletes data stored in the partition and drops the partition. However, DROP PARTITION with ALGORITHM=COPY or old_alter_table=ON rebuilds the partitioned table and attempts to move data from the dropped partition to another partition with a compatible PARTITION ... VALUES definition. Data that cannot be moved to another partition is deleted.

DISCARD PARTITION No No No Only permits ALGORITHM=DEFAULT, LOCK=DEFAULT
IMPORT PARTITION No No No Only permits ALGORITHM=DEFAULT, LOCK=DEFAULT
TRUNCATE PARTITION No Yes Yes Does not copy existing data. It merely deletes rows; it does not alter the definition of the table itself, or of any of its partitions.
COALESCE PARTITION No Yes* No ALGORITHM=INPLACE, LOCK={DEFAULT|SHARED|EXCLUSIVE} is supported.
REORGANIZE PARTITION No Yes* No ALGORITHM=INPLACE, LOCK={DEFAULT|SHARED|EXCLUSIVE} is supported.
EXCHANGE PARTITION No Yes Yes
ANALYZE PARTITION No Yes Yes
CHECK PARTITION No Yes Yes
OPTIMIZE PARTITION No No No ALGORITHM and LOCK clauses are ignored. Rebuilds the entire table. See Section 22.3.4, “Maintenance of Partitions”.
REBUILD PARTITION No Yes* No ALGORITHM=INPLACE, LOCK={DEFAULT|SHARED|EXCLUSIVE} is supported.
REPAIR PARTITION No Yes Yes
REMOVE PARTITIONING No No No Permits ALGORITHM=COPY, LOCK={DEFAULT|SHARED|EXCLUSIVE}

Non-partitioning online ALTER TABLE operations on partitioned tables follow the same rules that apply to regular tables. However, ALTER TABLE performs online operations on each table partition, which causes increased demand on system resources due to operations being performed on multiple partitions.

For additional information about ALTER TABLE partitioning clauses, see Partitioning Options, and Section 13.1.8.1, “ALTER TABLE Partition Operations”. For information about partitioning in general, see Chapter 22, Partitioning.


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