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29.5.1.5 Using a Stack Trace

On some operating systems, the error log contains a stack trace if mysqld dies unexpectedly. You can use this to find out where (and maybe why) mysqld died. See Section 5.4.2, “The Error Log”. To get a stack trace, you must not compile mysqld with the -fomit-frame-pointer option to gcc. See Section 29.5.1.1, “Compiling MySQL for Debugging”.

A stack trace in the error log looks something like this:

mysqld got signal 11;
Attempting backtrace. You can use the following information
to find out where mysqld died. If you see no messages after
this, something went terribly wrong...

stack_bottom = 0x41fd0110 thread_stack 0x40000
mysqld(my_print_stacktrace+0x32)[0x9da402]
mysqld(handle_segfault+0x28a)[0x6648e9]
/lib/libpthread.so.0[0x7f1a5af000f0]
/lib/libc.so.6(strcmp+0x2)[0x7f1a5a10f0f2]
mysqld(_Z21check_change_passwordP3THDPKcS2_Pcj+0x7c)[0x7412cb]
mysqld(_ZN16set_var_password5checkEP3THD+0xd0)[0x688354]
mysqld(_Z17sql_set_variablesP3THDP4ListI12set_var_baseE+0x68)[0x688494]
mysqld(_Z21mysql_execute_commandP3THD+0x41a0)[0x67a170]
mysqld(_Z11mysql_parseP3THDPKcjPS2_+0x282)[0x67f0ad]
mysqld(_Z16dispatch_command19enum_server_commandP3THDPcj+0xbb7[0x67fdf8]
mysqld(_Z10do_commandP3THD+0x24d)[0x6811b6]
mysqld(handle_one_connection+0x11c)[0x66e05e]

If resolution of function names for the trace fails, the trace contains less information:

mysqld got signal 11;
Attempting backtrace. You can use the following information
to find out where mysqld died. If you see no messages after
this, something went terribly wrong...

stack_bottom = 0x41fd0110 thread_stack 0x40000
[0x9da402]
[0x6648e9]
[0x7f1a5af000f0]
[0x7f1a5a10f0f2]
[0x7412cb]
[0x688354]
[0x688494]
[0x67a170]
[0x67f0ad]
[0x67fdf8]
[0x6811b6]
[0x66e05e]

Newer versions of glibc stack trace functions also print the address as relative to the object. On glibc-based systems (Linux), the trace for a crash within a plugin looks something like:

plugin/auth/auth_test_plugin.so(+0x9a6)[0x7ff4d11c29a6]

To translate the relative address (+0x9a6) into a file name and line number, use this command:

shell> addr2line -fie auth_test_plugin.so 0x9a6
auth_test_plugin
mysql-trunk/plugin/auth/test_plugin.c:65

The addr2line utility is part of the binutils package on Linux.

On Solaris, the procedure is similar. The Solaris printstack() already prints relative addresses:

plugin/auth/auth_test_plugin.so:0x1510

To translate, use this command:

shell> gaddr2line -fie auth_test_plugin.so 0x1510
mysql-trunk/plugin/auth/test_plugin.c:88

Windows already prints the address, function name and line:

000007FEF07E10A4 auth_test_plugin.dll!auth_test_plugin()[test_plugin.c:72]