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MySQL 5.7 Reference Manual  /  ...  /  Evaluation of Table-Level Replication Options

16.2.5.2 Evaluation of Table-Level Replication Options

The slave checks for and evaluates table options only if either of the following two conditions is true:

First, as a preliminary condition, the slave checks whether statement-based replication is enabled. If so, and the statement occurs within a stored function, the slave executes the statement and exits. If row-based replication is enabled, the slave does not know whether a statement occurred within a stored function on the master, so this condition does not apply.

Note

For statement-based replication, replication events represent statements (all changes making up a given event are associated with a single SQL statement); for row-based replication, each event represents a change in a single table row (thus a single statement such as UPDATE mytable SET mycol = 1 may yield many row-based events). When viewed in terms of events, the process of checking table options is the same for both row-based and statement-based replication.

Having reached this point, if there are no table options, the slave simply executes all events. If there are any --replicate-do-table or --replicate-wild-do-table options, the event must match one of these if it is to be executed; otherwise, it is ignored. If there are any --replicate-ignore-table or --replicate-wild-ignore-table options, all events are executed except those that match any of these options. This process is illustrated in the following diagram.

Evaluation of Table-Level Filtering Rules in Replication

The following steps describe this evaluation in more detail:

  1. Are there any table options?

    • Yes.  Continue to step 2.

    • No.  Execute the event and exit.

  2. Are there any --replicate-do-table options?

    • Yes.  Does the table match any of them?

      • Yes.  Execute the event and exit.

      • No.  Continue to step 3.

    • No.  Continue to step 3.

  3. Are there any --replicate-ignore-table options?

    • Yes.  Does the table match any of them?

      • Yes.  Ignore the event and exit.

      • No.  Continue to step 4.

    • No.  Continue to step 4.

  4. Are there any --replicate-wild-do-table options?

    • Yes.  Does the table match any of them?

      • Yes.  Execute the event and exit.

      • No.  Continue to step 5.

    • No.  Continue to step 5.

  5. Are there any --replicate-wild-ignore-table options?

    • Yes.  Does the table match any of them?

      • Yes.  Ignore the event and exit.

      • No.  Continue to step 6.

    • No.  Continue to step 6.

  6. Are there any --replicate-do-table or --replicate-wild-do-table options?

    • Yes.  Ignore the event and exit.

    • No.  Execute the event and exit.

Note

Statement-based replication stops if a single SQL statement operates on both a table that is included by a --replicate-do-table or --replicate-wild-do-table option, and another table that is ignored by a --replicate-ignore-table or --replicate-wild-ignore-table option. The slave must either execute or ignore the complete statement (which forms a replication event), and it cannot logically do this. This also applies to row-based replication for DDL statements, because DDL statements are always logged as statements, without regard to the logging format in effect. The only type of statement that can update both an included and an ignored table and still be replicated successfully is a DML statement that has been logged with binlog_format=ROW.


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