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MySQL HeatWave on AWS  /  Backups  /  Restoring a Backup to a New DB System

10.3 Restoring a Backup to a New DB System

When you restore a backup, you create a new DB System and restore the backup to it. You can change the shape and the amount of data storage for the new DB System.

A restored DB System uses the same MySQL Administrator user name and password that was in effect when the backup was created.

DB System backups are Amazon EBS snapshots which are automatically saved to Amazon Simple Storage Service (Amazon S3).

Tip

Amazon EBS snapshots are loaded asynchronously. You can use the new DB system as soon as it is active, while data continues to load in the background. If you access data that has not been loaded yet, the DB System downloads the requested data (which can therefore take longer than usual to access), then resumes asynchronous loading. If you want to download your frequently accessed data immediately, run a full-table scan such as SELECT * on the relevant tables.

To restore a backup to a new DB System:

  1. In the MySQL HeatWave Console, select the MySQL tab.

  2. Select the Backups tab. In the list of backups, find the backup you want to restore to a new DB System, and do one of the following:

    • Click on the row of the backup to highlight it, and click Restore Backup.

    • Click the name of the backup to open the MySQL Backup Details page. Click Restore Backup.

    The Restore Backup to new MySQL DB System dialog is displayed.

  3. Provide basic information for the new DB System:

    • Display Name: Specify a display name for the new DB system or use the generated default name.

    • Description: Specify a description for the new DB System or use the generated description.

    Note

    A restored DB System uses the same MySQL Administrator user name and password that was in effect when the backup was created.

  4. Select the Hardware shape. If you are using this process to get a different shape or more storage for the DB System, choose the shape that you want the new DB System to have.

    • Shape: Select the shape to use for your DB system. The shape determines the resources allocated to the system. For information about shapes, see Supported Shapes. Selecting a shape for a DB System also selects the configuration associated with that shape. See Chapter 11, Configuration.

    • Data Storage Size (GiB): Specify the amount of block storage, in GiB, to allocate to the DB System. This block storage stores all data, logs, and temporary files. Binaries are not stored in this block storage. Enter a number between 50 and 16384.

      Note

      Ensure that the specified Data Storage Size is greater than or equal to the size of the backup you are restoring.

    • Database Version: Select the MySQL Server version you want to deploy. The latest MySQL Server version is selected by default.

  5. Configure the Availability zone, which determines the physical location of the DB System:

    • Select Automatically to have the physical AWS Availability Zone selected for you.

    • Set Manually to select the physical AWS Availability Zone where the MySQL DB System will be created.

    Note

    A physical Availability Zone is identified by an Availability Zone ID (AZ ID). For information about AZ IDs and how to view them, see Availability Zone IDs for your AWS resources, in the AWS RAM User Guide.

  6. Configure Networking settings:

    • Allowed Client Addresses: Specify public-facing client IPv4 addresses that are permitted to connect to the DB System endpoint. Addresses are specified in CIDR format; for example: 1.2.3.4/24. Multiple addresses in CIDR format can be specified in a semicolon-separated list; for example: 1.2.3.4/24; 1.2.3.4/32. For information about specifying IP addresses in CIDR format, see Section 3.2, “Creating a DB System”.

    • Port: The port on which the MySQL server listens. The default is port 3306. You can specify a port number between 1024 and 65535.

    • X Protocol Port: The X Protocol port on which the MySQL server listens, supported by clients such as MySQL Shell. The default port is 33060. You can specify a port number between 1024 and 65535.

  7. Click Next to proceed to creating a HeatWave Cluster.

  8. Provide basic information for the new HeatWave Cluster:

    • Display Name: Specify a display name for the new HeatWave Cluster or use the generated default name.

    • Description: Specify a description for the new HeatWave Cluster.

  9. Under HeatWave Cluster Configuration, select a node shape and number of nodes.

    • Shape: Select a HeatWave node shape. For information about supported shapes, see Supported Shapes.

      Note

      If you intend to use HeatWave AutoML functionality, the HeatWave.256GB node shape is recommended when creating a HeatWave Cluster. The HeatWave.16GB node shape may not have enough memory for training on large data sets. If you see error messages about this (such as ML003024), use the larger shape instead.

    • Cluster Size: The number of HeatWave nodes to create. Enter a number between 1 and 128.

      Tip

      Because the new DB System does not yet contain any data, you cannot use MySQL Autopilot to estimate the required cluster size (as described in Section 4.1.1, “Estimating Cluster Size with MySQL Autopilot”). If you want to make an estimate, after loading the data to the DB System, you can delete the HeatWave Cluster and create a new one following the instructions in Section 4.1, “Creating a HeatWave Cluster”.

  10. Click Restore to restore the backup to the new DB System.

    You are returned to the DB Systems page where you can monitor the state of the operation, which may take some time to complete. The state will change from Creating to Active when the operation has completed successfully.