14.2.10.5 Physical Row Structure

The physical row structure for an InnoDB table depends on the MySQL version and the optional ROW_FORMAT option used when the table was created. For InnoDB tables in MySQL 5.0.3 and earlier, only the REDUNDANT row format was available. For MySQL 5.0.3 and later, the default is to use the COMPACT row format, but you can use the REDUNDANT format to retain compatibility with older versions of InnoDB tables. To check the row format of an InnoDB table use SHOW TABLE STATUS.

The compact row format decreases row storage space by about 20% at the cost of increasing CPU use for some operations. If your workload is a typical one that is limited by cache hit rates and disk speed, compact format is likely to be faster. If the workload is a rare case that is limited by CPU speed, compact format might be slower.

Rows in InnoDB tables that use REDUNDANT row format have the following characteristics:

  • Each index record contains a 6-byte header. The header is used to link together consecutive records, and also in row-level locking.

  • Records in the clustered index contain fields for all user-defined columns. In addition, there is a 6-byte transaction ID field and a 7-byte roll pointer field.

  • If no primary key was defined for a table, each clustered index record also contains a 6-byte row ID field.

  • Each secondary index record also contains all the primary key fields defined for the clustered index key that are not in the secondary index.

  • A record contains a pointer to each field of the record. If the total length of the fields in a record is less than 128 bytes, the pointer is one byte; otherwise, two bytes. The array of these pointers is called the record directory. The area where these pointers point is called the data part of the record.

  • Internally, InnoDB stores fixed-length character columns such as CHAR(10) in a fixed-length format. Before MySQL 5.0.3, InnoDB truncates trailing spaces from VARCHAR columns.

  • An SQL NULL value reserves one or two bytes in the record directory. Besides that, an SQL NULL value reserves zero bytes in the data part of the record if stored in a variable length column. In a fixed-length column, it reserves the fixed length of the column in the data part of the record. Reserving the fixed space for NULL values enables an update of the column from NULL to a non-NULL value to be done in place without causing fragmentation of the index page.

Rows in InnoDB tables that use COMPACT row format have the following characteristics:

  • Each index record contains a 5-byte header that may be preceded by a variable-length header. The header is used to link together consecutive records, and also in row-level locking.

  • The variable-length part of the record header contains a bit vector for indicating NULL columns. If the number of columns in the index that can be NULL is N, the bit vector occupies CEILING(N/8) bytes. (For example, if there are anywhere from 9 to 15 columns that can be NULL, the bit vector uses two bytes.) Columns that are NULL do not occupy space other than the bit in this vector. The variable-length part of the header also contains the lengths of variable-length columns. Each length takes one or two bytes, depending on the maximum length of the column. If all columns in the index are NOT NULL and have a fixed length, the record header has no variable-length part.

  • For each non-NULL variable-length field, the record header contains the length of the column in one or two bytes. Two bytes will only be needed if part of the column is stored externally in overflow pages or the maximum length exceeds 255 bytes and the actual length exceeds 127 bytes. For an externally stored column, the 2-byte length indicates the length of the internally stored part plus the 20-byte pointer to the externally stored part. The internal part is 768 bytes, so the length is 768+20. The 20-byte pointer stores the true length of the column.

  • The record header is followed by the data contents of the non-NULL columns.

  • Records in the clustered index contain fields for all user-defined columns. In addition, there is a 6-byte transaction ID field and a 7-byte roll pointer field.

  • If no primary key was defined for a table, each clustered index record also contains a 6-byte row ID field.

  • Each secondary index record also contains all the primary key fields defined for the clustered index key that are not in the secondary index. If any of these primary key fields are variable length, the record header for each secondary index will have a variable-length part to record their lengths, even if the secondary index is defined on fixed-length columns.

  • Internally, InnoDB stores fixed-length, fixed-width character columns such as CHAR(10) in a fixed-length format. Before MySQL 5.0.3, InnoDB truncates trailing spaces from VARCHAR columns.

  • Internally, InnoDB attempts to store UTF-8 CHAR(N) columns in N bytes by trimming trailing spaces. (With REDUNDANT row format, such columns occupy 3 × N bytes.) Reserving the minimum space N in many cases enables column updates to be done in place without causing fragmentation of the index page.


User Comments
Sign Up Login You must be logged in to post a comment.