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MySQL 5.6 Reference Manual
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22.9.6.1 The events_statements_current Table

The events_statements_current table contains current statement events, one row per thread showing the current status of the thread's most recent monitored statement event.

The events_statements_current table can be truncated with TRUNCATE TABLE.

Of the tables that contain statement event rows, events_statements_current is the most fundamental. Other tables that contain statement event rows are logically derived from the current events. For example, the events_statements_history and events_statements_history_long tables are collections of the most recent statement events, up to a fixed number of rows.

For information about configuration of statement event collection, see Section 22.9.6, “Performance Schema Statement Event Tables”.

The events_statements_current table has these columns:

  • THREAD_ID, EVENT_ID

    The thread associated with the event and the thread current event number when the event starts. The THREAD_ID and EVENT_ID values taken together form a primary key that uniquely identifies the row. No two rows will have the same pair of values.

  • END_EVENT_ID

    This column is set to NULL when the event starts and updated to the thread current event number when the event ends. This column was added in MySQL 5.6.4.

  • EVENT_NAME

    The name of the instrument from which the event was collected. This is a NAME value from the setup_instruments table. Instrument names may have multiple parts and form a hierarchy, as discussed in Section 22.4, “Performance Schema Instrument Naming Conventions”.

    For SQL statements, the EVENT_NAME value initially is statement/com/Query until the statement is parsed, then changes to a more appropriate value, as described in Section 22.9.6, “Performance Schema Statement Event Tables”.

  • SOURCE

    The name of the source file containing the instrumented code that produced the event and the line number in the file at which the instrumentation occurs. This enables you to check the source to determine exactly what code is involved.

  • TIMER_START, TIMER_END, TIMER_WAIT

    Timing information for the event. The unit for these values is picoseconds (trillionths of a second). The TIMER_START and TIMER_END values indicate when event timing started and ended. TIMER_WAIT is the event elapsed time (duration).

    If an event has not finished, TIMER_END and TIMER_WAIT are NULL before MySQL 5.6.26. As of 5.6.26, TIMER_END is the current timer value and TIMER_WAIT is the time elapsed so far (TIMER_ENDTIMER_START).

    If an event is produced from an instrument that has TIMED = NO, timing information is not collected, and TIMER_START, TIMER_END, and TIMER_WAIT are all NULL.

    For discussion of picoseconds as the unit for event times and factors that affect time values, see Section 22.2.3.1, “Performance Schema Event Timing”.

  • LOCK_TIME

    The time spent waiting for table locks. This value is computed in microseconds but normalized to picoseconds for easier comparison with other Performance Schema timers.

  • SQL_TEXT

    The text of the SQL statement. For a command not associated with an SQL statement, the value is NULL. The maximum space available for statement display is 1024 bytes.

  • DIGEST

    The statement digest MD5 value as a string of 32 hexadecimal characters, or NULL if the statement_digest consumer is no. For more information about statement digesting, see Section 22.7, “Performance Schema Statement Digests”. This column was added in MySQL 5.6.5.

  • DIGEST_TEXT

    The normalized statement digest text, or NULL if the statement_digest consumer is no. For more information about statement digesting, see Section 22.7, “Performance Schema Statement Digests”. This column was added in MySQL 5.6.5.

  • CURRENT_SCHEMA

    The default database for the statement, NULL if there is none.

  • OBJECT_SCHEMA, OBJECT_NAME, OBJECT_TYPE

    Reserved. Always NULL.

  • OBJECT_INSTANCE_BEGIN

    This column identifies the statement. The value is the address of an object in memory.

  • MYSQL_ERRNO

    The statement error number, from the statement diagnostics area.

  • RETURNED_SQLSTATE

    The statement SQLSTATE value, from the statement diagnostics area.

  • MESSAGE_TEXT

    The statement error message, from the statement diagnostics area.

  • ERRORS

    Whether an error occurred for the statement. The value is 0 if the SQLSTATE value begins with 00 (completion) or 01 (warning). The value is 1 is the SQLSTATE value is anything else.

  • WARNINGS

    The number of warnings, from the statement diagnostics area.

  • ROWS_AFFECTED

    The number of rows affected by the statement. For a description of the meaning of affected, see Section 23.8.7.1, “mysql_affected_rows()”.

  • ROWS_SENT

    The number of rows returned by the statement.

  • ROWS_EXAMINED

    The number of rows read from storage engines during statement execution.

  • CREATED_TMP_DISK_TABLES

    Like the Created_tmp_disk_tables status variable, but specific to the statement.

  • CREATED_TMP_TABLES

    Like the Created_tmp_tables status variable, but specific to the statement.

  • SELECT_FULL_JOIN

    Like the Select_full_join status variable, but specific to the statement.

  • SELECT_FULL_RANGE_JOIN

    Like the Select_full_range_join status variable, but specific to the statement.

  • SELECT_RANGE

    Like the Select_range status variable, but specific to the statement.

  • SELECT_RANGE_CHECK

    Like the Select_range_check status variable, but specific to the statement.

  • SELECT_SCAN

    Like the Select_scan status variable, but specific to the statement.

  • SORT_MERGE_PASSES

    Like the Sort_merge_passes status variable, but specific to the statement.

  • SORT_RANGE

    Like the Sort_range status variable, but specific to the statement.

  • SORT_ROWS

    Like the Sort_rows status variable, but specific to the statement.

  • SORT_SCAN

    Like the Sort_scan status variable, but specific to the statement.

  • NO_INDEX_USED

    1 if the statement performed a table scan without using an index, 0 otherwise.

  • NO_GOOD_INDEX_USED

    1 if the server found no good index to use for the statement, 0 otherwise. For additional information, see the description of the Extra column from EXPLAIN output for the Range checked for each record value in Section 8.8.2, “EXPLAIN Output Format”.

  • NESTING_EVENT_ID, NESTING_EVENT_TYPE

    Reserved. Always NULL.

The events_statements_current table was added in MySQL 5.6.3.


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