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MySQL Enterprise Monitor 3.0 Manual
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15.1 Global Settings

Note

MySQL Enterprise Monitor is available as part of the MySQL Enterprise subscription, learn more at http://www.mysql.com/products/.

The Global Settings control the main configuration parameters for the entire MySQL Enterprise Monitor system, including your email notifications, data purge, and My Oracle Support credentials.

The Global Settings page is divided into these sections:

  • Server Locale

    Figure 15.1 MySQL Enterprise Monitor User Interface Settings: Server Locale

    MySQL Enterprise Monitor User Interface Settings: Server Locale

    The Server Locale setting determines the language of notification for the following items:

    • Email notifications.

    • SNMP traps.

    • The naming conventions for shared resources such as a replication group name prefix.

    The initial value in this drop down list box is the locale for the OS on which the MySQL Enterprise Monitor User Interface is running.

  • Server Hostname

    You can alter the Hostname, Port Number, and Login Display Name used to identify the MySQL Enterprise Service Manager when reporting notifications.

    Figure 15.2 MySQL Enterprise Monitor User Interface Settings: Server Hostname

    MySQL Enterprise Monitor User Interface Settings: Server Hostname

    Note

    Only change the Port setting if you have altered or redirected the original port used when installing MySQL Enterprise Service Manager. Entering the incorrect information does not affect the accessibility of your system, except when clicking links within the notification messages.

  • Data Purge Behavior

    The Data Purge Behavior section of the Global Settings page lets you remove old log files and also old data from the repository. The default purge interval is 4 weeks. To purge data, change this setting by choosing from the drop-down list. Choosing 12 months, for example, removes all data that is older than a year.

    Figure 15.3 MySQL Enterprise Monitor User Interface Settings: Data Purge

    MySQL Enterprise Monitor User Interface Settings: Data Purge

    Warning

    Purging data permanently removes information from the repository. Since events are derived from data contained in the repository, they are purged along with the data.

    Ensure that there is adequate disk space for the repository. If you are monitoring numerous servers and running many rules the size of the repository can increase rapidly. Choose purge behavior accordingly.

    Note

    The purge process is started approximately once every day, or when the MySQL Enterprise Monitor User Interface is restarted. If you change the purge duration from a large timespan to a smaller one, the data will be purged in increments of one hour, from oldest to newest, until the new data retention policy is met. This is done to reduce the load on the repository.

    Note

    The system assumes that events will be auto-closed, or closed manually. The purge functionality only purges closed events and related data.

    You can configure the data purge behavior in the following ways:

    • Remove Historical Data Collection Older Than configures the duration that the main data about your servers is retained. This includes all data collections, including CPU, memory and connections and activity statistics.

    • Remove Query Analyzer Data Older Than configures the duration that the query analyzer statistics and information about individual queries is retained.

    Notes for setting purge behavior:

    • Purging can be carried out manually by enabling the innodb_file_per_table for the repository database and then using an OPTIMIZE TABLE operation to reclaim space from deleted rows in the table.

    • If you change the purge value from a high value to a very low value, the space used by the purged data is not reclaimed from the InnoDB tablespaces. Do this by running OPTIMIZE TABLE on the MySQL tables for MySQL Enterprise Service Manager to reclaim the space from the purged rows.

  • My Oracle Support Credentials

    You can specify the credentials for logging into the My Oracle Support site. These should match the user name and password that you have registered with Oracle for access to the support site.

    Figure 15.4 MySQL Enterprise Monitor User Interface Settings: My Oracle Support Credentials

    MySQL Enterprise Monitor User Interface Settings: My Oracle Support Credentials

    Note

    Only administrators can change the My Oracle Support Credentials section; for other users, this section does not show up in the interface. For more information about different users and their rights see Section 15.2, “Manage Users”. Specifying incorrect credentials results in the error message, Your credentials do not appear to be valid.

  • HTTP Proxy Settings

    You might want to update your HTTP Proxy Settings if your MySQL Enterprise Service Manager is not directly connected to the internet. The proxy settings are used when updating the information within the What's New tab. For more information, see Section 13.3, “What's New”.

    Figure 15.5 MySQL Enterprise Monitor User Interface Settings: HTTP Proxy Settings

    MySQL Enterprise Monitor User Interface Settings: HTTP Proxy Settings

  • LDAP Authentication

    You can configure LDAP Authentication to be used for the users that are provided access to the MySQL Enterprise Monitor User Interface. To use LDAP authentication, it must have been enabled and configured within the settings.

    The configurable elements for LDAP authentication are:

    • Use LDAP for Authentication

      To enable LDAP authentication, click the Use LDAP for Authentication checkbox.

    • LDAP is Authoritative

      If you want to make LDAP the authoritative (only) authentication mechanism, check the LDAP is Authoritative checkbox. Note that if you select this option and the LDAP service is misconfigured, you can lock yourself out of MySQL Enterprise Monitor User Interface entirely.

    • Primary Server Hostname

      Hostname or IP address of the primary LDAP directory server.

    • Port Number

      Port number of the primary LDAP server. You must change this option to the port used for SSL connections if you have enabled encryption.

    • Secondary Server Hostname (optional)

      Hostname or IP address of the secondary/failover LDAP directory server.

    • Connect timeout:

      Time elapsed without establishing a connection to the LDAP server. If a connection is not established within the defined number of seconds, an error is returned.

      Note

      If the value is set to 0, the Connect timeout value defaults to the operating system's default value.

    • Read timeout:

      Time elapsed without a response to a request for data from the LDAP server. If no response is received within the defined number of seconds, an error is returned.

      Note

      If the value is set to 0, the Read timeout value defaults to the operating system's default value.

    • Port Number

      Port number of the secondary/failover LDAP server. You must change this option to the port used for SSL connections if you have enabled encryption.

    • Encryption

      Encryption type required for communication with the LDAP server(s). Supported options are None, StartTLS, and SSL.

    • Referrals

      Authentication should follow any referrals provided by the server. The default is to use whatever the LDAP directory server is configured to do. If you are using Microsoft Windows Active Directory, you must set this option to Follow.

    • LDAP Server Allows Anonymous Binds

      Optionally allow Anonymous binds.

      When unchecked (disabled), MySQL Enterprise Monitor provides for a pre-auth bind user to lookup account records. On "Active Directory," the most common user account attribute is "sAMAccountName", whereas it is common for Unix based LDAP to use CN. If the Active Directory server is not configured to honor CN binds, then it will fail to fetch credentials.

    • Authentication Mode

      The authentication mode to use. Choices are Bind as User, which binds to the LDAP directory using the credentials given to login to MySQL Enterprise Service Manager. Comparison requires an LDAP login/password that can see the configured password attribute to make a comparison with the given credentials.

    • Update Password On Save box and password fields

      To enter the LDAP server password, check the Update Password On Save box first. When you return to this dialog to update settings other than the LDAP password, leave this box unchecked to avoid blanking out the saved password. If the LDAP password does change later, check the box again and enter the new password.

    • User Search Pattern

      Pattern specifying the LDAP search filter to use after substitution of the username, where {0} marks where the username should be substituted for the DN.

    • User Search Base (leave blank for top level)

      The entry to use as the base of the subtree containing users. If not specified, the search base is the top-level context.

    • Search entire subtree

      The search scope. Set to true to search the entire subtree rooted at the *User Search Base entry. The default value of false requests a single-level search including only the top level.

    • Map LDAP Roles to Application Roles

      Specifies whether MySQL Enterprise Service Manager should use the roles defined in LDAP to map to MySQL Enterprise Monitor application roles. If enabled, and LDAP is not configured to be authoritative, if a user authenticates successfully via LDAP and has a valid mapped role, they are granted permissions to the application. Roles are mapped according to the entries in the Application Role/LDAP Role(s) fields, which take comma-separated lists of LDAP roles to map to the given MySQL Enterprise Monitor roles.

      If you select this option, you are provided with additional fields that let you configure how roles are looked up within the LDAP server.

    For more information on LDAP authentication and integration with Tomcat, see Tomcat Documentation.

  • Customize MySQL server name

    Figure 15.6 MySQL Enterprise Monitor User Interface Settings: Customize MySQL server name

    MySQL Enterprise Monitor User Interface Settings: Customize MySQL server name

    These settings change the way host names are displayed in the MySQL Enterprise Monitor User Interface, typically by shortening the names to avoid cluttering the display with repetitive information:

    • The Show MySQL server names as field controls whether the Monitor UI displays fully qualified domain names (the default); or only the host name, omitting the repetitive suffix such as .company_name.com; or host names transformed by a substitution expression, for example to turn a long multi-part host name into a short nickname.

      The syntax for the substitution expression is a name-value pair separated by an equals sign, with a regular expression on the left side and the replacement text on the right side. The regular expression follows the Java syntax from http://download.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/util/regex/Pattern.html. To keep special characters (particularly dot) from being interpreted within the regular expression, escape them with \ or make a single-item character class, [.] for example. If the right side contains whitespace, a comma, or is an empty string, surround it with single or double quotation marks. You can use backreferences such as $1, $2, and so on to substitute parts of the regular expression into the replacement text; you cannot use the $ character in the replacement text except as part of a backreference. You can include more than one replacement expression by separating them with commas. Some examples include:

      dx521\.example\.com=Staging
      dx984[.]example[.]com=Production
      database-server-(.*?)\.example\.com=$1
      ^database-server-="", [.]example[.]com$="", dx521="Staging DB",
      

      If you use incorrect syntax in the replacement expression, the original hostname is displayed with a suffix such as ( ! ); this suffix varies depending on your locale setting.

    • The Display connection endpoint values controls whether the detailed connection part of the hostname (such as the TCP/IP port number) is displayed. By default, it is always shown. You can set it to never be shown, or to only be shown if it is not the standard value. For TCP/IP connections, the default port is 3306. For socket connections, the default endpoint value is /tmp/mysql.sock.


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